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GEN (R) Daniel B. Allyn Addresses CGSC Class of 2019 at ALx Event

Picture of GEN (R) Daniel B. Allyn at ALx Event

GEN (R) Daniel B. Allyn addresses CGSC Class of 2019 at an Army Leader Exchange (ALx) event in Eisenhower Auditorium, Lewis and Clark Center, on 14 May 2019. During GEN Allyn's presentation "Leading to Success - One Soldier's Perspective", he shared his Leadership Philosophy and what he deemed to be the primary roles and characteristics of a good leader. During Q&A, when asked for suggested leadership readings, he recommends John C. Maxwell's "The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership" and Nathaniel Philbrick's "Valiant Ambition".

His presentation can be viewed on the Army Leader Exchange (ALx) Facebook Page

Army Ethic in Action: Character, Competence, and Commitment

Picture of a Silhouetted Soldier

The Army exists as a profession for one reason: to serve the nation by supporting and defending the Constitution in a way that upholds the rights and interests of the American people. The Army Ethic defines what it means to serve honorably … in the conduct of missions, performance of duty and all aspects of life. Living by and upholding the Army Ethic is the foundation for mutual trust and cohesive teamwork–the first principle of Mission Command.

This is the third article in the Army Ethic in action series. It contains three vignettes that illustrate how Soldiers and Army civilians have served and fought honorably, demonstrating the Army Ethic in action, and displaying character, competence, and commitment as trusted Army professionals.

Read the full article from the March edition of ARMY Magazine here: Character, Competence, and Commitment

Army Ethic in Action: Ethic Under Fire

Picture of Retired Col. David R. Hughes

Retired Col. David R. Hughes recalls his days in the Korean War vividly. Hughes tells a story about a time during the Korean War in 1951 when he was the company commander of Company K, 3rd Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment and he was ordered to attach and seize Kill 347 through an intervening Objective Rye. For his actions during this mission Hughes was recognized by a Distinguished Service Cross award. Many of the moral principles of the Army Ethic were demonstrated by Hughes and his men in this intense ground combat during his mission.

This is the second in a series of articles that will use vignettes to illustrate the Army Ethic in action. Each vignette is a true story about soldiers and, in future articles, Army civilians, demonstrating character, competence and commitment to accomplish the mission in the right way. The intent is to strengthen understanding of the Army Ethic and inspire honorable service within the Army profession

Read the full article from the February edition of ARMY Magazine here: Ethic Under Fire

The Army Ethic in Action

The moral principles of the Army Ethic, including the Army Values, provide the moral and legal basis for why and how we serve, guiding our decisions and actions. The Army exists as a profession for one reason: to serve the nation by supporting and defending the Constitution in a way that upholds the rights and interests of the American people. The Army Ethic defines what it means to serve honorably … in the conduct of our mission, performance of duty and all aspects of life. Living by and upholding the Army Ethic is the foundation for mutual trust and cohesive teamwork–the first principle of Mission Command.

This is the first in a series of articles that will use vignettes to illustrate the Army Ethic in action. Each vignette is a true story about soldiers and, in future articles, Army civilians, demonstrating character, competence and commitment to accomplish the mission in the right way. The intent is to strengthen understanding of the Army Ethic and inspire honorable service within the Army profession.

Read the full article on AUSA: Heart of the Army: Moral Principles Guide Why, How of Service

Prevailing in Large-Scale Combat Operations: "Character, Trust, and Mission Command"

AAOP FY 19-20 Theme Poster

"Prevailing in Large-Scale Combat Operations: 'Character, Trust, and Mission Command'" is the America's Army - Our Profession (AAOP) biennial theme for fiscal year 2019-2020. The Chief of Staff of the Army approves "America's Army - Our Profession" (AAOP) themes to educate the Total Force on topics important to the Army as a profession. The FY19-20 theme highlights the Army's imperative to prevail in large-scale combat operations by exercising mission command, which requires mutual trust and depends on character. The intent is to educate Soldiers and Army Civilians on The Army's Framework for Character Development and the interdependence of character, trust, and mission command.

The Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) encourages units, organizations, and leaders to integrate AAOP theme materials and concepts into professional development programs. CAPE has developed training materials, including a discussion guide, videos, and vignettes to help.

Visit the FY 19-20 AAOP Training Support Package page